HEALTHY TIPS TO REDUCE RISK OF DIABETES


We are already in the second half of the year, and you might have probably done a healthy check through your goals and plans for the year. At this point, it is also imperative to have gone back to the drawing board for some adjustments.

With a bit of planning and some dedication to your new healthy living goals, you can end 2018 on a high note. Hence the maxim “Health is Wealth” is not a cliché.

One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes.

The vast majority of cases are type-2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin.

The good news is type-2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the anti-diabetes drug metformin.

7 TIPS TO HELP REDUCE YOUR RISK:

Lose excess body fat:

Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent.

Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet:

Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar.

Drink water:

Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls.

Move your body:

Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive to insulin. The aforementioned 2006 study had volunteers exercising moderately 150 minutes a week. Brisk walking does the trick.

Stress less:

The stress response triggers the release of several hormones that increase blood sugar. Studies show that mindfulness meditation improves the ability to cope with stress. Physical activity and social support also help relieve stress.

Sleep well:

Chronic sleep deprivation and poor quality sleep increase the risk for diabetes and obesity. For tips on sleeping better, see this Remedy Chick’s blog. If you have continued problems sleeping, contact your doctor.

Keep medical appointments:

Warning signs of type 2 diabetes are less dramatic than those of type-1 diabetes. That’s why it’s important to see your doctor regularly.


Featured Posts
Posts Are Coming Soon
Stay tuned...
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
No tags yet.
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

 2018 Adoni Health Institute